Thursday, 6 August 2020

A new beginning for Wave Hub?

The Wave Hub Project in Hayle was the first commercial scale demonstration project for wave power in the world and when it was originally being developed some ten to fifteen years ago, there was a lot of potential. I always got behind the idea of wave power as part of our renewables energy mix. Here in the far south west we have enormous energy contained within the Atlantic swell. There have been a number of tentative developers who have been close to deploying at wave hub and one that actually did. However, a decade on, it is important to take stock. Some of the technical challenges around harnessing the power of waves have been harder to crack than hoped and, at the same time, offshore wind technology has progressed in leaps and bounds and now makes a major contribution to our national energy needs.
Recognising these developments, Wave Hub is now diversifying its approach and utilising the Wave Hub infrastructure for the deployment of Floating Offshore Wind (FLOW). A floating offshore wind turbine is an offshore wind turbine that allows a turbine to generate electricity in water depths where fixed -foundation turbines are not possible but they make use of what is now a mature technology using wind turbines. They are usually placed in shallow waters and are able to reach stronger and more consistent winds than onshore wind turbines. The Celtic Sea is a unique area containing the required depths to build the offshore wind towers required to generate the renewable wind. Moreover placing them out at sea helps to reduce the effect that such an installation would have were it to be inshore.
Floating offshore wind is at a unique point in its development and the opportunity for the Wave Hub site to be used as a base to implement this renewable technology is exciting. In recent months I have been working with the team at Wave Hub to help overcome some of the issues that need to be resolved so that the plan can be progressed. We have made some good progress, but there is still a bit more to be settled.
Camborne, Redruth and Hayle are towns that have always had a rich industrial heritage leading to some of the most important inventions and discoveries that this country has made. Much of the expertise developed here in drilling technology for mining was transferred to drilling for offshore oil and gas with companies like Seacore and LDD at Tolvaddon and these companies are now applying their expertise to offshore renewables. We have the skills locally to make this project succeed, even if by a different route than originally intended.

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