Thursday, 6 June 2019

D-Day Landings 75th Anniversary

This week, the 45th President of the United States, Donald Trump, visited the UK on an official state visit. Not everyone agrees with Donald Trump’s politics but people like Jeremy Corbyn and Sadiq Khan, the London Mayor, were wrong to boycott the state banquet hosted by the Queen. These occasions go way beyond the politics of the day. The United States is our closest ally and the main reasons that the visit is taking place is to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the D-Day landings where Britain, America and Canada stood together to liberate Europe. 
D-Day was and still remains the largest combined land, air and naval operation in history. The invasion was conducted in two main phases – an airborne assault and amphibious landings. Shortly after midnight on 6th June, over 18,000 Allied paratroopers were dropped into the invasion area to provide tactical support for infantry divisions on the beaches. Following this, on the morning of June 6th some 156,000 British, American and Canadian troops launched from the sea and air on to French soil across 50 miles of Normandy coastline. The force included 5,300 ships and craft, 1,500 tanks and 12,000 planes. 
The D-Day landings were the first essential step for the Allied forces to liberate north-west Europe from German occupation. By sunset there were an estimated 10,000 casualties and more than 4,400 confirmed dead. The success of the D-Day landings lay in the fact that in the three months after the landings, the northern part of France would be freed, and the invasion force would be preparing to enter Germany, where they would meet up with Soviet forces moving in from the East. 
We owe so much to the many men who gave their lives so that we may enjoy all that we do today. In recognition of their sacrifice, there will be an official service in Portsmouth which the Prime Minister and Donald Trump will attend jointly to mark the 75th anniversary. There will also be other services in Normandy and across France, in which veterans from the D-Day landings will return to the beaches that they fought on, on that fateful day. 
As part of the events to mark this anniversary, the Culture Secretary also recently announced that a number of WW2 landmarks have been officially listed as protected as a memorial for future generations. Six replica landing craft, nine sunken tanks, two armoured bulldozers and parts of Mulberry harbours in Dorset, Devon and West Sussex will be listed. These structures were integral to the largescale preparations that took place along the coastline of Devon and Dorset. 
This year’s anniversary serves as a reminder of the bonds and special relationship that we have with our allies like the United States. As we face the new challenges of the 21st century, the anniversary of D-Day reminds us all of all that our countries have achieved together, and whilst the world has changed, we are forever mindful of the sacrifices of those who gave so much for peace.

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